Radiocarbon dating religion

The official and complete report on the experiment was published in Nature.

As reported in Nature, Professor Bray of the Instituto di Metrologia 'G.

Luigi Gonella claimed to have taken from the radiocarbon sample before it was distributed for dating.

The actual provenance of these threads is uncertain, as Gonella was not authorized to take or retain genuine shroud material, Raymond Rogers stated in a 2005 article that he performed chemical analyses on these undocumented threads, and compared them to the undocumented Raes threads as well as the samples he had kept from his STURP work.

The development in the 1970s of new techniques for radio-carbon dating, which required much lower quantities of source material, prompted the Catholic Church to found the Shroud of Turin Research Project (S. Also present were Cardinal Ballestrero, four priests, archdiocese spokesperson Luigi Gonella, photographers, a camera operator, Michael Tite of the British Museum, and the labs' representatives.

group initially planned to conduct a range of different studies on the cloth, including radio-carbon dating. The six labs that showed interest in performing the procedure fell into two categories, according to the method they utilised: In 1982, the S. The blind-test method was abandoned because the distinctive three-to-one herringbone twill weave of the shroud could not be matched in the controls, and a laboratory could thus identify the shroud sample.

group and the candidate laboratories turned into a P. However, in a 1990 paper Gove conceded that the "arguments often raised, …

that discarding the blind-test method would expose the results – whatever they may be – to suspicion of unreliability.

On September 28, 1988, British Museum director and coordinator of the study Michael Tite communicated the official results to the Diocese of Turin and to the Holy See.Colonetti', Turin, "confirmed that the results of the three laboratories were mutually compatible, and that, on the evidence submitted, none of the mean results was questionable." Although the quality of the radiocarbon testing itself is unquestioned, criticisms have been raised regarding the choice of the sample taken for testing, with suggestions that the sample may represent a medieval repair fragment rather than the image-bearing cloth.It is hypothesised that the sampled area was a medieval repair which was conducted by "invisible reweaving".Rogers took 32 documented adhesive-tape samples from all areas of the shroud and associated textiles during the STURP process in 1978. Luigi Gonella (Department of Physics, Turin Polytechnic University) on 14 October 1979, which Gonellla told him were from the Raes sample.On 12 December 2003, Rogers received samples of both warp and weft threads that Prof.

Leave a Reply